Le liseur du 6 h 27

Liseur

Est-ce que vous avez lu ce petit livre ? C’est à mon avis tout à fait merveilleux !

Advertisements

Sag mir wo die Blumen sind

I am grateful to Susan for sharing her memories of the German rendition of ,,Where have all the fowers gone”, sung by the one and only Marlene Dietrich. Watch an emotional performance of the song here and you will never forget that ,,bleiben” takes ,,sein” in the perfect tense!

Sag mir wo die Blumen sind Songtext

Sag mir wo die Blumen sind,
wo sind sie geblieben
Sag mir wo die Blumen sind,
was ist geschehen?
Sag mir wo die Blumen sind,
Mädchen pflückten sie geschwind
Wann wird man je verstehen,
wann wird man je verstehen?

Sag mir wo die Mädchen sind,
wo sind sie geblieben?
Sag mir wo die Mädchen sind,
was ist geschehen?
Sag mir wo die Mädchen sind,
Männer nahmen sie geschwind
Wann wird man je verstehen?
Wann wird man je verstehen?

Sag mir wo die Männer sind

wo sind sie geblieben?
Sag mir wo die Männer sind,
was ist geschehen?
Sag mir wo die Männer sind,
zogen fort, der Krieg beginnt,
Wann wird man je verstehen?
Wann wird man je verstehen?

Sag wo die Soldaten sind,
wo sind sie geblieben?
Sag wo die Soldaten sind,
was ist geschehen?
Sag wo die Soldaten sind,
über Gräben weht der Wind
Wann wird man je verstehen?
Wann wird man je verstehen?

Sag mir wo die Gräber sind,
wo sind sie geblieben?
Sag mir wo die Gräber sind,
was ist geschehen?
Sag mir wo die Gräber sind,
Blumen wehen im Sommerwind
Wann wird man je verstehen?
Wann wird man je verstehen?

Sag mir wo die Blumen sind,
wo sind sie geblieben?
Sag mir wo die Blumen sind,
was ist geschehen?
Sag mir wo die Blumen sind,
Mädchen pflückten sie geschwind
Wann wird man je verstehen?
Wann wird man je verstehen?

Social Media Language Learning

Just imagine if all the time you spend on your phone, laptop or tablet could be helping you master a foreign language.

Social Media Language Learning connects interactive social media channels with language learners.

Idiomplus was one of the first to implement a Social Media Language Learning programme. It focuses on integrating social media channels to stimulate conversation between language learners.

How Can Social Media Help Language Learning?

We all click, surf and browse. So why not focus on language learning?

The social aspect also allows you to connect to other learners and native speakers.

Using videos, newscasts and conversations in chat groups to observe the cultural aspects of a country where your target language is spoken can be a huge advantage to learning. Language learning is a social and interactive process so seeing, hearing and participating in things like fashion, food and the arts gives dimension to your learning.

Facebook

This is a great place to meet up and interact.

There are groups for every language. Some groups communicate entirely in the target language so it’s an immersive social media experience.

Use the Facebook search bar to look for language learning groups.

We Do Languages, is a starting point for many people.

Alternatively, you could start your own group!

Blogs

There are loads of blogs about learning other language, such as The Polyglot Dream and Fluent in 3 Months. Try French.

Twitter

Reading tweets in a foreign language can be a fun way to learn. Try the Polyglot Club Many tweets are about language, but they also cover culture.

And, of course, there’s the Twitter account for Duolingo, the language learning programme and app.

WhatsApp

Use this social device to connect with people overseas and practise your language skills.

Snapchat

Snapchat can encourage language learning. With users worldwide, there are plenty of people who can help with pronunciation and grammar issues. You could post a short video of yourself speaking and ask for feedback.

YouTube

YouTube has lots of material for language learners. Search using hashtags related to the language you want to learn.

Want to find French videos? Or is German more your thing?

So why not give language learning on social media a go?

This post was adapted from FLUENTU